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On this day in 1981 (10/12/1981) BBC report: Mystery disease kills homosexuals.

I was having a look back in time for recent stories that made the U.K. news over the last 50 or so years. I came across this news story from 10/12/1981. As the BBC headline reported: ‘A mysterious epidemic, which

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Primary school teachers’ suicide rate nearly double the national average.

As a former teacher I still occasionally browse the TES website, just to see whether I would be prepared to re-enter a profession I once loved. However, as I read an article on a teacher who had committed suicide, some

How safe is your local hospital?

Having direct experience of working in a busy acute hospital, a recent article in the Guardian portrays an accurate picture of ‘daily life’ for inexperienced doctors. I have personally seen many of these dedicated & hard working inexperienced doctors frantically

The NHS: Having a say.

Having a bit of free time, I read the minutes of board meetings from several hospitals that I have an association with. I was struck by how difficult is was to navigate through each of these hospitals websites to eventually

People can live with a Mental Health condition.

Another theme which this blog will explore is the experiences of those who live in the city with a Mental Health diagnosis. I’ll start with an article published in the Guardian about Debbie who discovered that: ‘Art allowed me to

Driving in & out of a busy city!

Moving from a relatively quiet town to a busy city, I became immediately concerned that very quickly, I could potentially lose my driving licence, no claims bonus and a few pints of blood, because I have to drive to work on an extremely busy motorway. As a keen reader

The worst form of inequality?

A truism even today?

The hospital: A Cathedral of medicine.

With the closure of the oldest hospital in England recently announced, it reminded me that hospitals in times past were often viewed as places to be avoided except where there was little, or no hope. For historians writing on the history of western medicine: ‘hospitals were places associated

A safe & timely discharge from hospital?

I cannot pretend to fully understand the politics behind NHS England publishing statistics on ‘delayed transfers of care’, but I just wonder if Health and social care professionals actually worked together, instead of spending ages apportioning blame, outcomes for patients would be better? A couple